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Topic Title: Burning Knee Pain
Created On: 08/17/2001 02:32 PM
 
 03/21/2018 02:04 AM

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akshayv

<p>&#160;I purchased this shoes for 96-year-old aunt, rigid toes from ill-fitting shoes following hammer-toe surgery. Amputation of one toe on each foot was required. Able to wear these shoes for the following surgeries with no pain. They give her great support and are easy to put on and remove. Podiatrist recommended Orthofeet beand's shoe.</p>
 03/21/2018 02:03 AM

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akshayv

<p>&#160;I had a special shoe need for my mom's diabetic feet. I was able to remove the innersoles and replace them with the ones from the podiatrist. Orthofeet the only shoes I could find that would provide support and allow for the straps to still wrap around over the thicker innersole. I still had to take them to the shoe repairman to have the Velcro moved, but he was able to customize them for a more secure fit. Great shoe for this particular need.</p>
 03/21/2018 02:03 AM

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akshayv

<p>&#160;I had a special shoe need for my mom's diabetic feet. I was able to remove the innersoles and replace them with the ones from the podiatrist. Orthofeet the only shoes I could find that would provide support and allow for the straps to still wrap around over the thicker innersole. I still had to take them to the shoe repairman to have the Velcro moved, but he was able to customize them for a more secure fit. Great shoe for this particular need.</p>
 02/21/2018 12:27 AM

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akshayv

<p>&#160;I have a bunion, hammer toes, wide front foot and narrow heel, low arches but none of that matters with the construction of orthofeet's shoes. I used to have pain in my heels and balls of my feet but no more. Yesterday I walked 7 miles and didn't come home with that "I can't wait to get these shoes off" feeling you get with other brands. They start off comfortable and stay comfortable. Thank you!!!!</p>
 10/30/2017 08:59 AM

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Oldmommy

<p>&#160;Omg I fixed this problem and typed a long post about it and the post got blocked and I couldn't copy it before it disappeared.</p>
<p>Bottom line: Trigger Point Therapy Workbook, 3d edition, figure 9.18.</p>
<p>Fixed it. Boom.&#160;</p>
 02/06/2016 08:51 PM

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ajaytuque

<p>The burning sensation that you get near your patella (below or to either side) with no apparent trauma can be a damaged sensory nerve. The infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve can get damaged when kneeling on a hard surface. This creates a burning sensation when touched or rubbed, but no pain when walking, running, etc. Kneeling will be painful as well. There will be no swelling, redness, or any other sign of a problem. It's very common to happen at age 40 and older. It may take many months to heal as the nerve regenerates very slowly, but it will heal on its own. Avoid kneeling on hard surfaces in the meantime. I'm a chiropractor and have come across this before. I hope this helps!&#160;</p>
 11/28/2015 03:29 PM

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ctspartans

<p>&#160;Let me start out by saying, I have had this issue for 3 years and it has not gone away.&#160; I installed hardwood floors in my house 3 years ago and have had an ongoing knee issue in my left knee that was the result of me going down on it for 10 days in a row without a knee brace (dumb). Having problems carrying kids up stairs, walking down stairs... Can't jog, jump on it, etc. I went to an orthopedic surgeon and they couldn't diagnose it after X-Ray and MRI. Very frustrated at 40 with a bum knee...&#160; I'm assuming i damaged this nerve but could be beyond repair?&#160; Has anyone gotten any good rehab ideas from orthos, therapists, etc.?&#160; </p>
 12/12/2014 12:26 AM

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Swampdiver

<p>I would agree with one of the doc's previous posts who said this is a form of common peroneal nerve entrapment. More specifically a branch of that nerve which supplies the lateral surface of the knee along the joint line and below. It also seems to supply the area of the tibial tubercle where the patellar tendon attaches.</p>
<p>I had a similar problem develop after spending a weekend on my knees under cottage insulating a floor. I did have on knee protection but the pads were quite flimsy and I was in the knee flexed position for a good ten hours over the two days.</p>
<p>Summarizing all the injury mechanisms mentioned on the thread we see:</p>
<p>1. installing hardwood floors</p>
<p>2. veterinarian on floor with animals</p>
<p>3. playing with kids on knees</p>
<p>4. installing sprinkler system while kneeling on concrete</p>
<p>5. playing with puppy on hardwood floor</p>
<p>6. doing splits with knees bent behind</p>
<p>7. traditional Japanese sitting in Aikido style</p>
<p>8. insulating cottage floor from underneath on rocky surface</p>
<p> </p>
<p>The common mechanism here is a flexed knee for a considerable period of time on a hard surface where the nerve is likely compressed or stretched such that it is injured. As other posters have mentioned nerve injuries often take months to heal but most will do so over time so be patient.</p>
<p>Here is a link to the likely culprit nerve called the lateral cutaneous nerve of the calf which is a branch off the common peroneal nerve. </p>
<p>The best way to prevent this injury is to minimize time on one's knees on hard surfaces and if necessary purchase a high quality pair of knee pads!</p>
 09/18/2014 12:22 PM

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kellygrimes

<p>You may not notice it everyday but our knee is one of the most used joints in our body and because of that it is also prone to pains and fractures. Knee pain is a condition that can be experienced by all ages and knee pain can mean a serious condition if you just let it happen.</p>
<p>If you experience knee pain for a long period of time or it happens to you constantly then go see a doctor to have it check.</p>
<p>In Mexico I know someone who is an expert in diagnosing such condition, his name is Dr. Max Greig and he is one of the [url=http://www.placidway.com/profile/1891/Dr.-Max-Greig-Orthopedic-Surgeon]best orthopedic surgeon in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico[/url].</p>
 09/10/2014 09:25 PM

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JRR

<p>My Goodness, such a large number of people without answers. The common symptoms among those commenting are the result of a focal connective tissue problem involving the common peroneal nerve.</p>
<p>Try to imagine the nerve traveling through the soft tissues, capable of sufficient flexibility to accommodate full flexibility of the knee joint. Now consider a specific point where the soft tissues and the common peroneal nerve meet and have improperly made a firm attachment causing the nerve to become improperly immobilized, or attached to connective tissues and thereby reducing its flexibility. In other words, the nerve's ability to accommodate flexion is reduced because it has become restricted within the tissues. It is similar, but not necessarily the definition of entrapment. </p>
<p>When the knee joint is subsequently fully flexed, it actually stretches the common peroneal nerve to the extent that it injures or tears it slightly. The result is intense burning pain on the lateral surface tissues that in many cases causes paresthesia, or numbness. Deep sensation is retained, but soft touch is compromised so that when you touch the area about 2 or 3 inches in circumference it feels numb. Involvement can extend medially under the patellar bone in some instances.</p>
<p>The pain can also be reproduced when kneeling on a hard surface or over-flexing the knee joint when squatting or attempting to step to a high platform. Either one or both knees can become involved and it is chronic in nature, with fluctuations of good days vs bad. Surgery is not a viable option since precise location of the damage and ability to repair the nerve tissues is presently out of reach by the medical profession.</p>
<p>As you can observe by reading the vast number of similar complaints, the injury and symptoms are quite commonly presented in both primary care practice, orthopedics and sports medicine.</p>
<p>Lastly, it's nothing to necessarily worry about and the present nature of the complaint is pretty much all that occurs, making it a nusiance. Efforts to reduce symptoms are aimed at avoiding further irritation, using protection such as pads when kneeling, avoiding over-flexing the joint, etc.</p>
<p>Best Regards,</p>
<p>J.R. Rane, MD (ret.)</p>

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